Primal Eating in Japan – the Basics 1

edit: I’m updating these lists every time something new comes to me.

Everyone loves lists. Here are a couple to get us started.

 

The Good

Sashimi

Yakitori, Yakiniku (sans teriyaki/dipping sauces)

Attention to detail when it comes to ingredient selection and food preparation (similar to the French)

Standard portion sizes smaller than back home

All-you-can-eat meat restaurants

Most things you want from anywhere in the world can be obtained here

Fresh seafood at reasonable prices in most parts of the country

People here aren’t afraid of offal

 

The Bad

Rice, noodles or alcohol with every meal

Lots of traditional Japanese food used sugar for its preserving properties (think: sechi ryori which you have over New Year’s)

Not just sugar but also mirin, katakuriko, corn starch, etc find their way into even the simplest of recipes, making eating out quite difficult if you are strict primal

Tempura (perfectly healthy seafood and vegetables, ruined by a coating of batter and fried in “salad” oil)

Products you want from overseas can be expensive

Cakes/sweets/etc are delicious here

 

 

The Ugly

Of the hundreds of products on the shelves in the food section of my local pharmacy there were three that I consider primal (macadamia nuts, pistachio nuts, and bottled water).

3/4 of the supermarket is crap that shouldn’t be brought back to your cave for consumption. But this is the same anywhere in the West and even most third world supermarkets are filled with crap these days.

Same attitude towards soy-based oils, canola and “salad” oil as back in the West.

 


The good thing about the above lists is that you only need to be concerned about the first one. There is no shortage of primal options here in Tokyo or elsewhere in Japan, and once you get used to it you’ll wonder why you were ever such a cry baby in the first place.

 

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